MANRESA: JOSEPH BEUYS: 1491-1566 IGNATIUS OF LOYOLA

http://www.artandreligion.de/data/index.php?idcatside=35

At the URL listed above Friedhelm Mennekes has collected insights regarding Joseph Beuys, and his work Manresa (Ignatius of Loyola). Mennekes has described the relation between art and religion found not just in the work of Beuys, but in other art as well. In 2002 Mennekes was awarded the Wilhelm-Hausenstein-Medal of the Bavarian Academy of the Fine Arts, Munich, “for his outstanding achievement in the field of promoting visual arts“.

Mennekes has been engaged in many discussions with artists through exhibitions and lectures that address this vital relationship of creative expression and experienced religion. These encounters are documented in print in a multitude of catalogue contributions, essays and monographs that discuss individuals such as Donald Baechler, Joseph Beuys, Christian Boltanski, James Brown, James Lee Byars, Francis Bacon, Eduardo Chillida, Marlene Dumas, Jenny Holzer, Anish Kapoor, Barbara Kruger, Arnulf Rainer, David Salle, Cindy Sherman, Antoni Tàpies, Rosemarie Trockel, and Bill Viola among others. Mennekes poses systematic questions, addressing individual works and also their vital relationship to the broader world of contemporary culture. He seeks structural correspondences and parallels that address our experience of faith and doubts in organized religion, as well as the secular world. Above all, however, he shows through over one hundred interviews with artists that their work is not simply dealing with private convictions of a personal nature, but with large issues that relate to all kinds of people striving to live a meaningful life.

OBSERVATION: It is necessary to understand that art may contain insight and meaning beyond the mundane. Many artists have worked to demonstrate the potential of human thought and action.
The potential (action), that we find in the work of Joseph Beuys, is the path that leads to full participation in the mystery of humanity.

FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE: GOETHE: KOSUTH

“As the man who acts must, according to Goethe, be without a conscience, he must also be without knowledge; he forgets everything in order to be able to do something; he is unfair toward what lies behind and knows only one right, the right of what is now coming into being as the result of his own action.”

OBSERVATION: This quote was extracted from a piece done by Joseph Kosuth. In the context of the art, Kosuth also quoted a newspaper cartoon describing commercialization in art, free thinking and how it is necessary to sometimes sacrifice integrity and values in order to participate in the system where art is simplified in order to be better suited for mass consumption.

There have been times in art history when artists led the pursuit of social responsibility, and freedom of intellect. The lines of art, and commercial production have become blurred in recent years, where the production of art has been centered on the prevailing attitude of conspicuous consumption. Each artist must recognize the purpose of their individual direction, follow that path, and ultimately reap the reward for that personal responsibility: Nietzsche: “the result of his own action”.

ELEGANT MYSTERIES OF PAST LIVES

ARISTOTLE (384 BC), PLATO (427 BC), SOCRATES (470 BC), AESCHYLUS, LEONARDO DA VINCI (1452), MICHELANGELO BUONAROTTI, GIOVANNI BELLINI, RAPHAEL, ALBRECHT DURER, J ROBERT OPPENHEIMER, ENRICO FERMI, PTOLEMY (90), EDWARD TELLER, ALBERT EINSTEIN (1879), STEPHEN HAWKING (1942), PYTHAGORAS (570 BC), DEMOCRITUS (460 BC), NICOLAUS COPERNICUS (1473), FRANCIS BACON (1561), NIKOLA TESLA ( ), GALILEO GALILEI (1564), THOMAS HOBBES (1588), SIR ISAAC NEWTON (1642), RENE DESCARTES (1596), VOLTAIRE (1694), GEORGE BERKELEY (1685), WALTER BENJAMIN, CHARLES DARWIN (1809), KARL MARX (1818), SIGMUND FREUD (1856), EMILE DURKHEIM (1858), VLADIMIR LENIN (1870), CARL JUNG (1875), BERTRAND RUSSELL (1872), NOAM CHOMSKY ( 1928), ARCHIMEDES (287 BC), JOHANNES KEPLER (1571), ROBERT BOYLE (1627), BENJAMIN FRANKLIN (1706), JAMES WATT (1736), CHARLES DARWIN (1809), LOUIS PASTEUR (1822) ALFRED NOBEL (1833), ALEXANDER BELL (1847), THE WRIGHT BROTHERS (1867/71), ALEXANDER FLEMING (1881), CARL SAGAN (1934), ALEXANDER THE GREAT (356 BC), RAMESES, JULIUS CAESAR (100 BC), CONSTANTINE THE GREAT (280), LOUIS XIV (1638), PETER THE GREAT (1672), CATHERINE THE GREAT (1729), GEORGE WASHINGTON (1732), THOMAS JEFFERSON (1743), NAPOLEON BONAPARTE (1769), ABRAHAM LINCOLN (1809), MAHATMA GANDHI (1869), WINSTON CHURCHILL (1874), FRANKLIN D ROOSEVELT (1882), CHARLES DE GAULLE (1890), NELSON MANDELA (1918), MATRIN LUTHER KING JR (1929), ADAM, NOAH, ABRAHAM, MOSES, CONFUCIUS, SIDHARTHA GAUTAMA, JESUS CHRIST, PATANJALI, DHARMAKIRTI, TSONG KHA PA, MUHAMMAD, BAHA’U’LLAH, JALAL AL-DIN RUMI, MARTIN LUTHER, JOSEPH SMITH, PARAMAHANSA YOGANANDA, KASYAPA, MILAREPA, DINNAGA, CHANDRAKIRTI, ST FRANCIS OF ASSISI, JOHN CALVIN, POPE JOHN PAUL II, DALAI LAMA, NEALE DONALD WALSCH, BUCKMINSTER FULLER, FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, VITRUVIUS, ARTHUR C CLARKE, LINUS PAULING, LAWRENCE KOHLBERG, HOWARD BLOOM, TEILHARD DE CHARDIN, JOHANN CARL FRIEDRICH GAUSS (1777), EDWIN HUBBLE, MARIE CURIE, JEAN PIAGET, FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE, WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, PIERRE DE FERMAT, MAX PLANCK, IVAN PAVLOV, GOTTFRIED LIEBNIZ, ST THOMAS AQUINAS, IMMANUEL KANT, B F SKINNER, AND ………

OBSERVATION: Attempting to list all of the great minds who have contributed to the developments of human capability is an exercise of limitless proportion. In the process of contemplating the great thinkers throughout human history, it is necessary to include names of those who contributed intellectual, human, and technological awareness, as well, as to recognize anonymous individuals who contributed ideas without recognition. This being the case, it may not be possible to include all people who should be included in this list of great thinkers. As new revelations come about the list will be updated!

JOSEPH BEUYS/DAVID KASTNER EXHIBITION NEW YORK AUGUST 2010

Following are press releases describing the upcoming Beuys/Kastner show to be held at: Ico Gallery, 606 West 26th Street, NY, NY 10001,

BEUYS/KASTNER:  DISTRACTION  2010
BEUYS/KASTNER: DISTRACTION 2010
5-28 August, 2010, Opening Reception: Friday August 13, 2010.

For further information regarding dates and times for the exhibition, please contact Skylor Brummans at Ico Gallery: 1.212.966.3897, or contact David Kastner directly @ www.davidkastner.com

http://worldbookandnews.com/entertainment/art-a-artists/69984-Joseph-Beuys-and-David-Kastner-Distraction-at-Ico-Gallery.html

http://www.dailyfinance.com/article/joseph-beuys-and-david-kastner/1120761/

http://newsblaze.com/story/2010061613040200001.pnw/topstory.html

http://www.foxbusiness.com/story/joseph-beuys-david-kastner-distraction-ico-gallery/

http://www.worldmarketmedia.com/1876/section.aspx/1688026/joseph-beuys-and-david-kastner-distraction-at-ico-gallery

http://www.cnbc.com/id/37738618

SENSORY EXPERIENCE: 1690

John Locke, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Book II, Ch. 8, Sec. 7-26, 1690.

“Whatsoever the mind perceives in itself, or is the immediate object of perception, thought, or understanding, that I call idea; and the power to produce any idea in our mind, I call quality of the subject wherein that power is. Thus a snowball having the power to produce in us the ideas of white, cold, and round,–the power to produce those ideas in us, as they are in the snowball, I call qualities; and as they are sensations or perceptions in our understandings, I call them ideas; which ideas, if I speak of sometimes as in the things themselves, I would be understood to mean those qualities in the objects which produce them in us.”

OBSERVATION: It is always necessary to understand the relation between mind, perception, that being perceived, and the abstraction formed through conscious behavior. It is interesting to note how thinkers throughout human history have observed the dynamics of the mind’s relation to the tangible world, very often attempting to describe that contact.